Phone Booth Project

Revealing the distinctive and compelling nature of Martu communication across the vast Western Desert, The Phone Booth Project features a Pilbara phone booth, large-scale video projections and multi-lingual dialogues.

Martu filmmaker Curtis Taylor and established Melbourne artist Lily Hibberd have worked collaboratively with two Martu communities, Parnngurr and Punmu, gathering candid and humorous accounts of daily life and extraordinary stories of adaptation to western technology in the use of phone booths in remote desert communities.

The artists wish to acknowledge all the people who contributed stories, including Gladys Bidu, Melda Charles, Corey Flat, Rachel Handley, Simon Jones, Bert Lane, Shaylene Malana, Carl Marney, Mulyatingki Marney, Steve McAlpin, Carlston Miller, Gavin Nanudie, John (Bigfella) Reudavey, Patricia Reudavey, Judith Samson, Kanu Taylor, Muuki Taylor, Wakka Taylor, Fiona Webb, Jimmy Williams, and the kids of Punmu and Parnngurr.

Thanks also to Rosie Williams, Mick Everett and the camp dogs of the Western Desert.

This project is supported by the State Government of  Western Australia, through the Department of Culture andthe Arts.

By Various Artists

Lily Hibberd and Curtis Taylor, The Phone Booth Project, three channel video installation, Fremantle Arts Centre 2012

Lily Hibberd and Curtis Taylor, The Phone Booth Project (still), three channel video installation, Fremantle Arts Centre 2012

Lily Hibberd and Curtis Taylor, The Phone Booth Project, three channel video installation, Fremantle Arts Centre 2012

Lily Hibberd and Curtis Taylor, The Phone Booth Project, three channel video installation, Fremantle Arts Centre, 2012

Lily Hibberd and Curtis Taylor, The Phone Booth Project, three channel video installation, Fremantle Arts Centre, 2012

Curtis Taylor inside the Punmu phone booth, 2012

Lily Hibberd inside Punmu phone booth, 2012

OTHER exhibitions